Punching Above their Weight : Small States in Key Mediation Roles. Ghana’s Capacity and Prospects for Mediation Learning from Nordic Examples

James McKeown

Research output: ThesisMaster's thesisTheses

Abstract

This thesis examines the role of small states in conflict mediation along two axes. First, it seeks to explain and explore the role and the capacity of small states in international peace mediation by using the case of Ghana. Second, the study turns the centre of attention to how Ghana can contribute meaningfully to conflict mediation by comparing it with the examples from the Nordic countries of Finland, Norway and Sweden and more specifically the insights they bring and challenges they pose.

The study relies on a qualitative research approach to obtain and scrutinize the data. The study uses existing literature on the subject matter as well as interviews.

This study suggests that, in spite of the increasing popularity of the role of small states in peace mediation globally in recent years, at the very least, has not received the needed attention from the extant literature. The study further suggests that Ghana’s role with regards to conflict mediation can move from being overlooked to being an internationally acclaimed success story if a systematic investment is made in strengthening the country’s mediation competences.

This thesis concludes by arguing that the insights obtained from the mediation infrastructure of the Nordic countries can be retained, and some of the potential challenges overcome by providing a conceptual apparatus to engage these issues frontally for future policy research.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationMaster of Social Sciences
Awarding Institution
  • Åbo Akademi
Award date31 Dec 2015
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2015
MoEC publication typeG2 Master's thesis, polytechnic Master's thesis

Field of science

  • International political science

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