Indigenous Self-Government in the Arctic: Assessing the Scope and Legitimacy in Nunavut, Greenland and Sápmi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This chapter considers Indigenous self-determination in the Arctic from a comparative perspective with a focus on Canada, Greenland and Sápmi. Drawing on fieldwork with Indigenous research participants from the three regions, this chapter examines the meaning, scope and status of self-determination in the Arctic. The main results demonstrate that while the objectives and challenges regarding implementing Indigenous self-determination are similar across the Arctic, the circumstances and thus the prospects of self-determination vary considerably from region to region. Specifically, the author considers and compares the self-government institutions in Nunavut, Greenland and Sápmi.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRoutledge Handbook of Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic
EditorsTimo Koivurova, Else Grete Broderstad, Dorothée Cambou, Dalee Dorough, Florian Stammler
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter15
Pages253-266
ISBN (Electronic)978-0-429-27045-1
ISBN (Print)978-0-367-22039-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020
MoEC publication typeA3 Part of a book or another research book

Publication series

SeriesRoutledge International Handbooks

Field of science

  • Social policy

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Indigenous Self-Government in the Arctic: Assessing the Scope and Legitimacy in Nunavut, Greenland and Sápmi'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Citation for this output