Experiencing the Elements: User Study with Natural Material Probes

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, we present the first systematic user study exploring the user experience and perceptions towards different natural materials – water, ice, stone, sand, fire, wind and soup bubbles. By trying out different materials, participants (n = 16) expressed their associations and perceptions, rated different qualities of the materials, and described their impressions through product reaction cards. Our findings reveal for example that light weight and ease of movement are perceived as central qualities when inspiring and fun elements are sought for. This exploratory study shines light on user experiences with natural elements, and provides an experimental grounding for naturalistic tangible user interface design. Material qualities in tangible user interface design create a subtle, but critical part of the user experience.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHuman-Computer Interaction – INTERACT 2015
Subtitle of host publication15th IFIP TC 13 International Conference, Bamberg, Germany, September 14-18, 2015, Proceedings, Part I
EditorsJulio Abascal , Simone Barbosa, Mirko Fetter, Tom Gross, Philippe Palanque, Marco Winckler
Place of PublicationBasel
PublisherSpringer
Pages324-331
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-319-22701-6
ISBN (Print)978-3-319-22700-9
Publication statusPublished - 2015
MoEC publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
Event15th IFIP TC 13 International Conference, - Bamberg, Germany
Duration: 14 Sep 201518 Sep 2015

Publication series

SeriesLecture Notes in Computer Science
Number9296
ISSN0302-9743

Conference

Conference15th IFIP TC 13 International Conference,
Country/TerritoryGermany
CityBamberg
Period14.09.201518.09.2015

Field of science

  • Visual arts and design

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