Adjusting parenting and perceptions of well-being in the host country: A comparative analysis of immigrant parents in the Finnish Arctic and Singapore

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This study is a comparative study of immigrant parenting styles in Singapore and Finland that explores the well-being of immigrant children. We analyze how immigrant parents in these countries perceive their adjustments of their parenting styles in their host countries. Based on previous studies, adjusting parenting to the host country’s cultural norms has an important influence on children’s well-being. The determinants of immigrant parenting styles may differ based on sizes of their communities, the diasporas that they belong to, and the cities or countries where they live. The host country’s opportunities and amenities for families can encourage or hinder factors that affect the parenting styles of immigrants, which are significant in the educations of their children. This chapter also discusses the importance of parental well-being and how it impacts children’s well-being. Based on our comparative analysis, more attention should be paid to parental well-being to enhance the wholistic integration of immigrant families in their host countries.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Future of the Arctic Human Population
Subtitle of host publicationMigration in the North
EditorsNafisa Yeasmin, Satu Uusiautti, Timo Koivurova, Timothy Heleniak
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Chapter7
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781003185024
ISBN (Print)9781032026749, 9781032027500
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022
MoEC publication typeA3 Part of a book or another research book

Publication series

Series Routledge Research in Polar Regions

Field of science

  • Social policy

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Adjusting parenting and perceptions of well-being in the host country: A comparative analysis of immigrant parents in the Finnish Arctic and Singapore'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Citation for this output